City of Thorns by Ben Rawlence, A Review

The author’s meticulous interaction with refugees in Dadaab yields detailed accounts of the circumstances that brought them to the camp, the impact of their residence in the camp, and the kind of future each of them likely faces. We also get a rare insight into Kenya’s Northeastern region and national politics, the terror of Al Shabaab in Kenya and Somalia, regional intergovernmental relations especially among the nation-states of Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, and Ethiopia, as well as a glimpse into the malady that tribalism is for Africa.

Other than giving the Dadaab refugees a voice and revealing with such intensity the multiple intricacies of their lives in the face of the numerous forces operating in their world, a major strength of this book is the author’s use of description. With his words, Rawlence paints vivid images of people, places, and situations, easily taking the reader with him into and around Dadaab, as well as through parts of Kenya and Somalia.

The Border by Don Winslow, A Review

Don Winslow’s ability to portray the reality of life, with characters having to choose between something bad and something even worse, makes him one of the most thrilling and realistic authors of our time. In The Border, Winslow demonstrates the often hard to see grey areas of life, complicating what many view as a straight-forward relationship between right and wrong, good and evil. This way, he lays bare the complex relationship between people and between nations, particularly the US and Mexico, and consequently critique simplistic approaches to these relationships.